Tag: sebum control

Learning More About Sebum and Sebum Control

We learn in school that largest bodily organ that we have is the skin. It is necessary and crucial as it holds together and serves as the protective covering of our bones, muscles and our internal organs. Our skin, most of the time, is the first thing that other people notice in us. And for many teenagers (and adults), this could be an upsetting and humiliating impression especially when acne is a problem. This is why sebum control is important.

If you are susceptible to pimples and acne, you may feel maddened and annoyed by sebum and might question why the body needs to produce this oily substance.

Beyond retaining the moisture of the hair and skin, sebum has other significant functions; this includes keeping the flexibility of the skin and working as a wall to defend the skin from infections caused by bacteria and fungi.

Knowing More About Sebum

Sebum is an oily substance that is light yellow in color produced by the sebaceous glands that aid in keeping moisture in the skin and hair. Sebum comprises triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, free fatty acids, cholesterol esters, and cholesterol. The oil found in the skin’s surface, however, doesn’t only constitute sebum as it likewise contains skin cell lipids, sweat, as well as matters from the environmental.

Prior to sebum reaching the skin’s surface, it mixes with cells within the hair follicle. Sebum, as the follicle is filled, spreads over the skin’s surface moisturizing and keeping it healthy. When this process works overly well, the outcome is seborrhea, a condition where an individual has oily skin and hair. Excessive sebum with dead skin cells, as well as dirt stuck in the pores could also result in acne. On the other hand, when insufficient sebum is emitted, it results in dry skin.

Balancing Production of Sebum

  • Too much or too little sebum could usually be treated by using creams, facial cleansers, and other topicals.
  • Although further research is required, there’s proof that your diet could affect sebum production. Avoid foods that upset the levels of your blood sugar and/or food that are packed with saturated fat. Increase your intake of fluids.
  • In serious cases, your doctor may recommend hormonal supplements or medication to aid in balancing the production of sebum from the inside.
  • If dryness is the issue, list every product that you use that comes in contact with your hair and skin. Products with acids, alcohol, and fragrances are known common constituents that bring about irritation. Switch to products that cater to sensitive skin.
  • Using hot water during showers removes the natural oils from your skin and hair. Switch to lukewarm water.
  • Moisturize your skin – face and body.
  • If you think excessive or deficiency of sebum is connected to a hormonal imbalance, consult a doctor or other provider of healthcare.