An Earlier Survey Shows Medical Students Experience Stress-Related Neck and Back Pain

While neck pain (NP) and back pain (BP) are problems common to adults, it is surprising to note that among the younger population, NP and BP are also prrevalent among medical students.

The findings were based on a survey conducted in 2013, by researchers at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Spine and Scoliosis Service, at Well Cornell Medical College in New York, and the Department of Orthopedics, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich. Print surveys were directly administered to 221 medical students out of 506 enrolled at accredited medical schools. Of the 221 who received the questionnaire, 210 completed the survey, which represented a completion rate of 96%.

The survey questions were formulated by a mix of fellowship trained orthopedic spine surgeon, a research fellow on orthopedic spine service and a medical student. Anonymity among participants was maintained, while Body Mass Index (BMI) and age were limited to what has been established as risk factors of musculoskeletal pain conditions. Lifestyle of the survey participants were evaluated based on the hours per week spent on studying, sleeping, exercising, walking and sitting.

Results of the survey revealed that 51% or 107 of the 210 students said they experience neck pain, back pain or both. Thirty-five percent (35%) of the 107, disclosed suffering from NP, while 47% reported suffering from BP. The rest, representing 31 %, suffered from both NP and BP.

Analysis of the Survey Results to Determine the Cause of NP and BP Among Medical Students

Results gathered from the survey were said to be a reflection of the highly stressful environment that students face when taking up medical education. Stressful conditions are present from as early as pre-med studies, in light of the competitiveness of medical school admissions. Apparently, the mental and physical demands of medical education courses can cause musculoskeletal pain; to which marital status and older age increased prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

Medical students advancing to the academic level where they have to take the initial phase of the United States Medical Licensing Exams, manifested signs of experiencing the most stress. Stress being related to anxiety over the possible results of said test; being the determinant of their eligibility to apply for specific medical subspecialties. Another notable analysis of the results, is that there was not enough evidence to support a correlation between the number of hours spent sitting, to neck pain and back pain.

Apparently, neck and back pain among medical students were more or less connected with mental stress rather than physical. On a relatively frequent basis, neck pain and back pain are accompanied by headaches. The information gathered can be useful on performing studies about the efficiency of medical students while in a related medical environment. The purpose of which is to work toward the improvement of the musculoskeletal health while undergoing medical training.

Those who would be interested to know more about neck pain and back pain caused by musculoskeletal disorder, can find additional useful information at the website of the Central Texas Spine Institute in Austin.

Silvija Topić

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